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Pabst Blue Ribbon

Pabst Blue Ribbon Created a 1,776-Pack to Celebrate the Fourth of July

“Because 1,777 seemed excessive.”

Pabst Blue Ribbon

If someone asks you to bring the beers to this year’s Fourth of July barbecue, why not blow their minds with a truckload of the fizzy liquid.

Heck, you might as well bring 1,776 of them just in case the party is bigger than expected.

Pabst Blue Ribbon, long an icon of Americana, is celebrating its home country’s 245th birthday on July 4 by crafting up a massive 1,776-pack. You know, it’s to represent the U.S. being founded in 1776.

Duh.

“We figured the best way to honor the year America claimed its independence was to make a box that held that many beers: 1,776,” said Nick Reely, VP of marketing for Pabst Blue Ribbon. “It’s the least we could do. I mean beyond making our beer can red and white and blue. Actually 1,776 is the most we could do because 1,777 seemed excessive.”

Agency partner 72andSunny L.A. is responsible for this monstrous 1,776-pack .

I hate to break it to you, but there are only four of the 1,776-packs being produced and distributed. The recipients have already been chosen, too.

The ice chest/cooler brand Igloo, skateboarding podcast The Nine Club, comedian Ali Macofsky, and Midwest band Hot Mulligan will each be producing PBR-centric content through summer and all the way to Labor Day.

“Sometimes an idea gets presented to you that’s so obvious and right, it makes you wonder what you’re even doing in this business,” said Bo MacDonald, creative director at 72andSunny L.A. “Shout out to the team for their continued craft, and a substantial thank you to our trusting and ambitious clients.”

This monumental moment isn’t PBR’s first flirtation with going big. The brand debuted a 99-pack in 2019 and says it’s actually working on a monstrous box that will dwarf even the 1,776er.

Party on, Pabst.

Matt Sterner

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